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Trefriw

Local villages: Dolgarrog | Llanbedr-y-Cennin | Tal-y-bont |

Trefriw lies on the edge of Snowdonia, on the B5106 road to the north-west of Llanrwst, and about 4½ miles north of Betws-y-coed by road. It is located on the western slopes of the glaciated Conwy valley, below the ridge of Cefn Cyfarwydd, the village having been largely built in a semicircle at the point where the river Crafnant flows from its hanging valley to join the river Conwy. The river Crafnant still provides power for the woollen mill, and in the past provided power for a number of other industries based along its banks, such as a forge which provided quarry tools.

Most of the village lies within the Snowdonia National Park, the boundary running down the main street of the village.

Apart from its reputation as a good starting point for walks, Trefriw is today mostly known for its woollen mills, and for the nearby chalybeate spa, first known to have been used by the Romans and further developed in about 1700. Its waters were one of very few throughout Europe to have been classified as a medicine due to their high iron content.

Tourist Attractions around Trefriw

Trefriw Woollen Mills | Trefriw

At Trefriw Woollen Mills we manufacture traditional Welsh bedspreads, tweeds and travelling rugs. Our Welsh tapestry is made into cushions, dinner sets, shoulder bags and purses. Our tweed is tailored into hats, caps, jackets, capes, ruanas and skirts.

Lake Crafnant | Trefriw

Llyn Crafnant nestles in a tranquil Welsh valley high in the Snowdonia National Park. The lake, which is three - quarters of a mile long and covers 63 acres, has good access and is well sheltered on all banks.

Trefriw Wells Spa | Trefriw

It is believed that Trefriw Wells Spa was first discovered by Romans from the XX Roman legion stationed at Canovium, 3 miles north of Trefriw. In about 1874 a Victorian bath and pump house was built and for the first time the water was sold to the public.